Jennifer Kath 21.50sc

Jennifer Kath

Jennifer Kath's activity stream


  • endorsed 2014-07-16 12:35:10 -0400
    I already have a green bin but find it very confusing (what goes in, what doesn’t). For example, how are diapers organic when they contain plastic? I would suggest more support for composting.

    Challenge 7 - Grow Green Bins

    Food-by-Szczel-cropped-400kb.jpgHelp Grow Green Bins

    One of the biggest types of waste is organic waste - this includes food waste and other things that can be composted, like tissues. However, many Torontonians just don’t have green bins. A large number of people who live in apartments and condos don’t have access to green bins. Many schools, small businesses and community centres across the City also don’t have green bins. That means thousands of tonnes of food waste are going to landfill.

    The good news is that the City offers green bins to every apartment, business, school and building that the City collects waste from. 

    Challenge:

    • Help bring green bins to more Toronto buildings. Call or email the building manager of your apartment, school or community centre to let them know that you'd like green bins for the building.

    • If you have green bins at home, think about community centres, businesses and other places you go that don't have green bins, but should. Write to the relevant property manager, or call your Councillor.

    Make a phone call, or use our suggestions below to send a letter to your building manager. 

     

    Dear (INSERT NAME of relevant property manager for your apartment, school, temple, etc),

    INSERT PERSONAL STATEMENT - e.g. "I live in this building." Or "I attend this school." Or "I use this Community Centre for weekly classes."

    Food waste is the largest single type of waste in our garbage. Toronto studies found that up to 70% of garbage from residents in apartments is food waste.

    Organic waste collection, or green bins, can greatly reduce waste, recycling valuable nutrients back into the soil. With City of Toronto collection, green bin pick up is free, which also means lower waste bills.

    Please bring green bin collection to our  APARTMENT / CONDO / SCHOOL / COMMUNITY building, so that we can start reducing waste.

    Sincerely

    YOUR NAME,  ADDRESS / EMAIL ADDRESS

     

    Take the extra step:
    Start a backyard composter, or set up a worm composter on your balcony or at your office!

    Organic_dumpster_square.jpg

    Endorse

  • endorsed 2014-07-16 12:32:33 -0400
    In Germany, where I grew up, the toothpaste companies are now selling their toothpaste without the surrounding carton. Instead, they use a tiny aluminum seal to cover the opening (similar to what you see when you buy multivitamin bottles here). The tubes still look great and it’s a lot less waste.


    Also, what happens to all these little plastic tags that are being used to close milk bags, bread, etc.? I find them extremely annoying and wonder how much waste they accumulate.

    Challenge 8 - Send Packaging Packing

    Mushrooms_bulk_vs_packaged_-_EAlfred.jpgSend Your Packaging Packing

    Too much packaging, wrapping, padding and stuffing comes with most products today. Most of it isn't necessary and is really just a way for companies to advertise. The worst part is that a lot of packaging isn't recyclable in your Blue Box!

    Take a look at the things you buy - is there an alternative with less packaging or recyclable packaging?

    For example, you can buy food in bulk stores to avoid food packaging.

    Challenge: 

    • Avoid products with excessive packaging, or non-recyclable packaging, or Change what you buy to avoid packaging and tell us about it

    • Snap a photo and share your story

     

    Take the extra step:
    Sign our petition to ask companies to stop using non-recyclable materials and to stop offloading the cost of disposal to cities. Click here to sign the petition.

    Read TEA's report on how companies can take responsibility for their product and packagin waste, including great examples of Ontario companies that are already doing it!

    Buying food in Bulk

    Endorse

  • endorsed 2014-07-16 12:27:10 -0400
    Donated my old clothes. There are many bins in my neighbourhood, which makes it easy.

    Challenge 4 - Think Twice Before You Buy

    Mending-Robert-Donovan-cropped-400kb.jpgThink Twice Before You Buy!

    Did you know that you can help the environment and reduce waste by simply not buying something? By repairing, sharing, swapping or re-using things, you can avoid wasteful packaging and avoid sending more things to landfill - and you’ll probably save money.

    We can buy less, share things, or buy second-hand things to reduce the waste impact of what we own.

    This includes things like borrowing a book from the library, or sharing tools with a neighbour instead of buying your own. You can also buy second hand clothing or donate your old furniture to a charitable store.

    Challenge: 

    • Instead of buying something new, reconsider it – borrow it from a friend, or rent it instead. Or, if you really need your own, buy it second hand. Share a photo and tell us about it!
    • Instead of throwing out something you don’t use anymore, donate or sell it to someone who could use it. Tell us about it! The City of Toronto website lists local non-profit groups that accept donations of used goods.

     

    Take the extra step:
    Repair it! Instead of tossing something out, get it repaired, or learn to maintain it yourself so it lasts longer. Mend your clothes, or get them altered by a tailor. Tell us about your repair adventure and snap a photo!

    Endorse

  • endorsed 2014-07-16 12:24:56 -0400
    I find it very useful. Even had some questions which were answered well.

    Challenge 3 - Use Toronto's Trash Tools

    Screenshot of Waste WizardUse Toronto’s Trash Tools

    Did you know that in Toronto, more than half of what residents are putting into their garbage bag shouldn't be there? Much of what is put out as garbage can actually be recycled or composted.

    There is a lot to learn about Toronto’s waste, and how we can reduce it.

    The good news is that the City has a number of user-friendly tools to help you put your waste in the right place!

    Challenge:

    • Visit toronto.ca/wastewizard and bookmark the Waste Wizard, a simple online search tool to identify where to put your waste.
    • The free City waste calendar lists waste collection days and each month features a number of tips on how to sort your waste - if you didn’t get one, order one now by calling 311 or send an email to 311@toronto.ca and ask for a Waste Calendar.

    Tip:  See "What Goes Where" on City of Toronto website for links to information on how to sort and set out your waste.

    wastewizardbanner_medium.jpg

    Take the extra step:
    If you already use the City tools above, share these links with a friend, or a family member.

    Endorse

  • answered 2014-07-11 13:04:42 -0400
    Q: 4 - What do you hope to get from the Waste Free Challenge?
    A: Just sharing some ideas and getting new ones

    Challenge 1 - Waste Free Survey

    The Waste Free Challenge is 10 simple steps that anyone in Toronto can take.
    Tell us about you, and why you are taking the Challenge!

    Take the survey